Tag Archives: stoner

SLOMATICS Estron vinyl repress available now for pre-order

In honour of Slomatics appearance at the Roadburn Festival 2017 this April we are very happy to announce that their last album Estron is back in print on vinyl. The rerelease of the original Head Of Crom-vinyl was sold out in months so we decided to do another run. 300 copies pressed on white vinyl this time around. Please note:

  • This is a pre-order. Items will be sent out 3rd week of March 2017.
  • Roadburn Festival 2017 pick-up is also possible. Please mail shop@burningworldrecords.com if this applies to you. We’ll refund you your shipping costs right away.
  • To order go to our new site here.
  • Or listen here:

More on Estron on The Obelisk:

Dual-guitar riff excavators Slomatics released their fourth full-length, Estron, last year on Burning World Records, and for those who’d worship at an altar of tone, it makes a suitable icon. The Belfast, Northern Ireland, trio roll out sans bass but want nothing for low end, Chris Couzens and David Majury contributing tectonic force on songs like “Tunnel Dragger” and “Lost Punisher” while drummer/vocalist Marty Harvey (also of War Iron) sets the lurch in motion, his voice echoing deep from within the band’s well-honed morass. Songs are spacious but consuming and full, and on the 38-minute offering there’s really only one moment of letup: the two-minute ambient interlude “Red Dawn” that precedes closer “The Carpenter” (also the longest track at 10:26). Beyond that, Slomatics offer few opportunities (some, but few) to let the air back into their listeners’ lungs, and that’s clearly the idea. Estron marked not only their fourth long-player, but also their first decade in the band, Couzens and Majury having started Slomatics in 2004 and Harvey joining in 2011 between their breakout split with Conan (review here) and 2012’s A Hocht full-length, released on Head of Crom. In that decade, and in any case well before they got around to EstronCouzens and Majury figured out what they wanted from their assault, and Estron bears the fruit of their hammering-out. Though slow-moving, the album is fluid front to back, and it thanks in no small part to Harvey‘s vocals, it has a sense of melody to complement its crushing, nigh-on-claustrophobic tonality.